Halfway

I like when projects have distinct points to reference progress!  In this case, I’m doing two halves so it’s pretty easy to tell.  The first half is done!

orange shawl

If I wanted a scarf, I could call it done.  I don’t want a scarf.  I like big shawls.  To grow this one, I’ve rotated it and picked up stitches along one side.  Like this…

orange shawl 5

Of course, in classic kitchen sink fashion, I didn’t just pick up stitches.  I staggered the edge skipping the first bit and then casting on an equal bit at the far end of my pick up.

orange shawl 3

I was aiming for colorful, asymmetric and funky.  It’s too soon for me to tell if I got there.  I really, really, really like the green side though.   The texture is so delightful to me!

orange shawl 7

It’s Sequence Knitting.  I sing the praises of Sequence Knitting every chance I get.  The basic idea is, pick a sequence-any sequence of stitches-and repeat it within the frame of your garment.

For me to get a symmetric triangle that meant I KFB’d at the start of every row and then K5, P5 across.  That’s it.  It’s the least stressful knit ever.  Of course, I had no idea what sort of texture I was going to get until I knit it.  I’d say I got lucky except every sequence I’ve tried has been a textural sensation.

Add in the marled effect of double stranding a solid + a variegated yarn (because: kitchen sink again!) and it’s a really complex, interesting fabric that was completely stree free and fun to do!

I love it.

I don’t want to mess it up.

That orange is very loud.

orange shawl 4

The variegated yarn has remained the same, only the solid changed but boy does that green disappear next to the intensity of the orange!

The texture hasn’t fully revealed itself either.  I’ve kept the same sequence *K5, P5*  but this time I’m knitting in a serpentine fashion.  Not every row is a multiple of 10 stitches (aka a full repeat).  If I had 7 stitches, I knit 5, purled 2 and then disregarded the last 3 purl stitches.  Each row, I started again with *K5, P5*.

This time, instead of disregarding an incomplete sequence, I’m carrying it forward to the next row.  If a row ends P2, I start the next row with P3 to complete the full sequence.  It’s creating a texture I can’t quite predict yet.

I predict it grows on me before the end.  There’s still time.


9 thoughts on “Halfway

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